Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

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Re: Program

Message publicper esra » ven. mai 23, 2014 10:55 pm

Laurentio scribeva:Pecha Kucha
We make a Pecha Kucha presentation of Interlingua in the language of all the participants. Pecha Kucha is a form of presentation where 20 images are shown for 20 seconds each, while a narrator talks about the topic that the images represent. Pecha Kucha arrangements are held in many cities world wide.


Sounds like variant of rapscript.de (2:02 continuing).
Radio Pruno projects: IA-DE translation of Dictionario basic (2,500 parolas) & digitalization of Interlingua kompakt (both under construction)
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Re: OT: Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper Laurentio » ven. mai 23, 2014 11:50 pm

bartlett scribeva:Slightly off-topic.

bartlett scribeva:If I were to try to speak coherent sentences in Interlingua, I would probably make a complete fool of myself.


I wouldn't worry too much about this. I'm certainly not the most eloquent of speakers myself. Among other things, I have a tendency to stutter (especially) when I speak interlingua. Generally, interlingua conversations tend to be a little slower than conversations in your own language, because most people are "rusty" (because we don't tend to voice chat so much). A couple of days into a conference, the pace starts to pick up!

bartlett scribeva:Many people who have been interested in (constructed) international auxiliary languages probably (very highly probably) have familiarity with Esperanto, and possibly even some degree of expertise in it. Whether we like it or not, Esperanto is the "300 kilo gorilla in the room" of conIALs.


Very true. But I don't think we should view the Esperantists as our competitors. In fact I think more collaboration and interaction with them could be very helpful for us, as I'm sure many of them would be interested in Interlingua. Of course, from a traditional Esperanto standpoint this might not necessarily be viewed as a positive thing! ;-)

bartlett scribeva:Being something of a "dabbler" in languages (to some degree or other I have studied French, Latin, classical Greek, and various conIALs, and have some familiarity with linguistics in general), I find that I tend to mix them up in my mind in a sort of hash. If I try to write anything in Interlingua, an Esperanto word or phrase pops into mind. If I try to write anything in Esperanto, sometimes Interlingua intrudes.


I had the same experience when I studied Esperanto (this was after I was already pretty fluent in Interlingua). A lot of Esperanto words started popping up in my Interlingua. But when I started spending less time on Esperanto again, things were soon back to normal.

When I try to speak German, a lot of Interlingua words sneak in. (I learned it in school, and haven't really spoken it much for 20+ years.)

I think it's natural that the language you are focusing on at one particular time will tend to intrude on other languages you use less frequently. I think it's just a question of "tuning in" to the language (using it actively for a while), and the other language will stop rearing its head, so to speak.

Once you get to be more or less proficient in both languages, I doubt it would be a problem.

bartlett scribeva:I speculate that others interested in the auxiliary language issue may have similar experiences, although the degree to which it is significant will obviously differ from person to person. That is in part why I wrote that I would probably make a fool of myself if I tried actually to speak Interlingua at all, as much as I highly esteem the language.


I wouldn't worry too much about this either. In fact, even people who have been using Interlingua actively for many, many years have been known to inadvertently use an Esperanto word (I'm not naming names). :)


bartlett scribeva:I suppose that I ought to pick one or the other and stick with it, seting the other gently and humanely aside.


I certainly don't think you need to put either language permanently aside! Maybe just choose which one to focus on at any given period?

bartlett scribeva:Yes, there can be usable modern tools, although some of us "older folks" might have trouble with them. (I have never used Skype and do not even know how it works.)


Based on the fact that you have your own website and are using this forum (which some seem to find an impossible task!), I can't imagine you having any problems with Skype!


bartlett scribeva:Also, there could be the matter of highly varying levels of ability. For example, I can read Interlingua fairly well, but except for a few programs of Radio Interlingua, I have never heard it spoken. (I have all of them, but have only listened to a few.) Even then I had serious trouble understanding the speakers. (As an older person with deteriorating hearing, I occasionally have difficulty understanding my native spoken English.)


I understand. This is of course a problem.

Anyway, if you did want to try to become more proficient in oral Interlingua, a useful intermediary step would be text chatting. There used to be regular Interlingua chats in IRC, and we even had a chat installed here at one point (but it was lost in a crash).

By the way, I hope you don't feel I am pressuring you into speaking Interlingua. If you prefer to use it only in writing, I of course completely respect your decision. I just wanted to comment on some of your points.
Le ultime vice modificate per admin sab. mai 24, 2014 2:27 am, modificate 1 vice in total.
Ration: corrected a couple of errors
Ask not what you can do for your conlang - ask what your conlang can do for you
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper bartlett » sab. mai 24, 2014 2:02 am

Excellent response! The gods willing :D :D :D I will try to respond soon.
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper esra » sab. mai 24, 2014 2:51 pm

Laurentio scribeva:Yes, I see what you mean about the conferences. But it doesn't have to be a solely written code in this day and age of skype and other voice chat programs.
Well, I could be wrong. But I believe that these voice chat communities will need to be established face-to-face offline first for longer lasting in future.
Radio Pruno projects: IA-DE translation of Dictionario basic (2,500 parolas) & digitalization of Interlingua kompakt (both under construction)
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Re: OT: Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper esra » sab. mai 24, 2014 3:03 pm

Laurentio scribeva:
bartlett scribeva:Being something of a "dabbler" in languages (to some degree or other I have studied French, Latin, classical Greek, and various conIALs, and have some familiarity with linguistics in general), I find that I tend to mix them up in my mind in a sort of hash. If I try to write anything in Interlingua, an Esperanto word or phrase pops into mind. If I try to write anything in Esperanto, sometimes Interlingua intrudes.


I think it's natural that the language you are focusing on at one particular time will tend to intrude on other languages you use less frequently. I think it's just a question of "tuning in" to the language (using it actively for a while), and the other language will stop rearing its head, so to speak.


I once read that in linguistics that effect is named code-switching.
Radio Pruno projects: IA-DE translation of Dictionario basic (2,500 parolas) & digitalization of Interlingua kompakt (both under construction)
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper bartlett » sab. mai 24, 2014 9:28 pm

In reference to Laurentio's kind and efficient post of yesterday. :) There are several points, but I won't try to respond to every one of them.

With respect to Esperanto, again, I maintain that it is the 300-kilo gorilla in the room. My observation has been that many Esperantists: 1) have little knowledge of any other constructed language(s); and/or 2) ignore them as "not serious" or "not real language(s)" (merely "projects" while Esperanto is a "real" language); and/or 3) hold them in contempt; and/or 4) consider that E-o is so far out in the lead that advocates of any other conIALs simply ought to give up and support E-o on the assertion that it is the only one with any faint hope of success. So my own estimate is that there is little likelihood of support from E-ists for Interlingua. (Be it noted that I genuinely like Interlingua and am not committed to either language at this point.)

Concerning social media, yes, it is possible that even some of us older individuals might be able to learn to use them, but also there is the issue that those Interlinguaists who there are outside of Europe tend be be in widely differing time zones, so this is a matter of consideration for "live" interaction. Also, I grant that some Interlinguaists may not have the opportunity to speak the language frequently, so it could well be that when they get together it may take them some time to "get up to speed" (as we say in the USA). I have never had the experience, but it is possible that with some opportunity I might be able to understand more spoken I-gua, given the chance to do so (although again, as an older person, I have troublesome hearing), and still might make a fool of myself if I were to try to speak it.

There is the matter of "code switching," as esra correctly put it. However, so far as I understand (I will cheerfuly accept correction ;) ) code switching most often comes into play with individuals who have real competence in two or more languages. (For example, Spanish is becoming more common here in some parts of the USA, and some young people may speak to their elders in a code-switched conglomeration of English and Spanish.) I am referring to the phenomenon of interference, when one has some familiarity with more than one language but does not have full mastery of any of them. One day I was at the Library of Congress (the world's largest library) in the city of Washington (I live nearby) and looked at materials in English, French, Ido, Interlingua, Esperanto, and Latino sine Flexione all in one session!!! :o Soon my head was swimming! :?

Again, it seems to me that in my own situation (as an older person), I ought to pick one language as a preference and do less with any others, inasmuch as I do not expect to see a "final victory" (to use an Esperantist term) for any one of them in my lifetime. But which? I genuinely esteem both Interlingua and Esperanto.

My thanks to both Laurentio and esra for their kind comments.
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper esra » dom. mai 25, 2014 12:51 pm

bartlett scribeva:There is the matter of "code switching," as esra correctly put it. However, so far as I understand (I will cheerfuly accept correction ;) ) code switching most often comes into play with individuals who have real competence in two or more languages. (For example, Spanish is becoming more common here in some parts of the USA, and some young people may speak to their elders in a code-switched conglomeration of English and Spanish.) I am referring to the phenomenon of interference, when one has some familiarity with more than one language but does not have full mastery of any of them.
How I had experiences with someone others code-switching (bilingual), regarding code-switcher takes word which has most fast recall speed/ lowest recall latency. Btw. Molee put these observations into what he named "the four fundamental principles" (page 2; cover page is page number 1).

It could be not fair, but I think, code-switching is lazy vocabulary recall behaviour, means people at regarding situation have less mental energy left to recall "correct" word of regarding language.
Radio Pruno projects: IA-DE translation of Dictionario basic (2,500 parolas) & digitalization of Interlingua kompakt (both under construction)
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper bartlett » dom. mai 25, 2014 8:24 pm

esra scribeva:It could be not fair, but I think, code-switching is lazy vocabulary recall behaviour, means people at regarding situation have less mental energy left to recall "correct" word of regarding language.

I do not in any way pretend to be a professional linguist or psychologist dealing with language phenomena. :oops: However, I have been referring to the matter of interference, in which (with respect to constructed auxiliary languages) a person has some minimal competence but not complete mastery of more than one. So far as I understand (I will accept correction), code switching occurs when an individual has some competence with more than one language (English and Spanish in parts of the USA, French and English in parts of Canada, whatever). Interference, at least as I refer to it, is a different matter, because the individual does not have adequate competence in either language, as is my situation with Interlingua and Esperanto. More or less useful reading capability with either, but little active, useful production ability with either. Which should I support? :?: (And I genuinely like both.)
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper Laurentio » mer. mai 28, 2014 5:36 am

Paul, thanks for your appreciative words. :)

I'll try to reply soon - hopefully the day after tomorrow.

bartlett scribeva:Again, it seems to me that in my own situation (as an older person),


Since you keep bringing age up yourself, I hope it's not impolite to ask exactly how old you are? :)
Ask not what you can do for your conlang - ask what your conlang can do for you
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Re: Come to the Interlingua conference in Sweden!

Message publicper bartlett » mer. mai 28, 2014 10:52 pm

Laurentio scribeva:Paul, thanks for your appreciative words. :)
I'll try to reply soon - hopefully the day after tomorrow.
bartlett scribeva:Again, it seems to me that in my own situation (as an older person),

Since you keep bringing age up yourself, I hope it's not impolite to ask exactly how old you are? :)

66, but due to failing health I sometimes feel older, and honestly my hearing is deteriorating, which makes it difficult to consider IALs as spoken languages, which they must be if they are to be taken seriously.
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